Steal Apple’s Design Philosophy To Improve Your Presentations

At the World Wide Developer’s Conference (WWDC) this week, Apple unveiled some pretty cool things: upcoming versions of its operating systems for mobile devices (iOS 7) and desktop computers (MacOS X “Mavericks”) as well as the next generation of its professional desktop computer, the Mac Pro.

Preceding all the news and announcements, though, was a nifty little video that explained Apple’s design philosophy:

If you design and deliver presentations regularly, the tie-ins should be obvious:

  • People remember what they feel
  • Doing something great means saying “no” to a lot of “good” things
  • Focus your presentation on one key idea

Want some specific suggestions for using these ideas in your presentations?

Get the FREE 9 guide or the Presentation Renovation eBook. You’ll learn how to take an ordinary presentation and make it extraordinary, applying the same principles that Apple uses to make remarkable stuff. The stuff that makes people camp outside Apple stores days before it’s released.

Almost Everything You Need to Know About Typography in One Ginormous Infographic

This (really big) infographic shows non-designers (and designers) just about all you need to know about using type:

  • Limit yourself to three typefaces for a project (I usually recommend using two)
  • Choose type with sufficient contrast
  • Choose type that conveys the right message

If you’re interested in choosing specific typefaces/fonts for your presentations, see my recommendations here and here.

Props to Noodlor for the fine work and FastCompany for the link. Click the graphic below for a much larger and more readable version.

A Quick & Comprehensive Type Guide - Noodlor

The 5 Phonetic R’s of Creativity on Haiku Deck

The newest Haiku Deck is a fun and easy-to-use presentation tool for the iPad. The fact that it’s also free makes this app a must-have no-brainer for iPad presenters.

The deck above took me about 20 minutes to make and demonstrates the appeal of the app. Searching for the right images takes a bit of time but it’s far faster than sifting through stock photo sites, buying/downloading images, adding keywords, and importing them onto the slides.

I could easily take this deck and expand on last week’s creativity post to deliver a talk. This is what makes Haiku Deck so cool and so powerful.