Can You Give a Presentation Without PowerPoint? And Without Speaking?

So the answer to the first question is easy: yes, you can give a presentation without PowerPoint.

You can use props (human brain, anyone?), drawings and animation (how does motivation work), or nothing at all (perhaps my favorite TED talk of all time).

But can you do a talk without speaking?

That’s going to take some creativity, yes?

That’s exactly what Chris Powers did, though, in this engaging talk on silence. Well, since he didn’t speak, I guess it’s not really a “talk;” it’s a presentation.

Remember: “presentation” doesn’t have to mean “PowerPoint.”

Different gets attention, and you need attention to get your idea across. How can you be different in your next presentation?

h/t SvN blog

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 5 – Use Pictures

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Since you’re using less text, you can now use more pictures. In fact, you could get rid of almost all your text and use pictures alone.

Research shows that adding an image to your message helps people remember 65% of what you said. If they only hear it, they’ll remember just 10%.

Choose images that express ideas and complement your talk. The image on the previous page, for example, could be used to convey the idea of choices.

And for maximum impact, use high-quality images that fill the slide (A “full bleed” images).

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 3 – One Idea Per Slide

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.011NOTE: This is the third in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Just as your presentation should emphasize one big idea, make each slide about one thing.

If you have five lines of text on your slide now, break it up into one line on five separate slides.

And get rid of the bullet points, fancy builds, text animation, and slide transition effects.

Too much clutter distracts people. They pay attention to the stuff on your slide instead of you. The purpose of your slide is not to show how clever you are. It’s to help you make your points (see point #1).

Instead, put more time into planning your message. Thee return is much higher than you’ll get on that silly swoosh effect.

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 2 – Your Presentation is About One Thing

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.008NOTE: This is the second in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

A lot of presentations try to cover too much ground. You may think you need to tell your prospect (or team or students) everything. You don’t.

Some presentations, on the other hand, are about nothing. They don’t have a point.

Your presentation should be about one thing. People have a hard time remembering so make your presentation about one big idea.

Just give them one thing and leave them wanting more.

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 1 – Don’t Default to PowerPoint

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.005NOTE: This is the first in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Who ever said every talk, meeting, or presentation needs PowerPoint?

Nobody.

Here’s a handy rule of thumb: if it (and “it” means anything in your presentation) helps you make your point, fine. If it doesn’t, consider dropping it.In fact, your presentation may be stronger without slides. (Abraham Lincoln never used PowerPoint.)

Do slides help you make your point? No?

Then do you really need them?