9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 9 – Get Inspired

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.029NOTE: This is the ninth (and last!) in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Want to see some good presentations?

TED
Michael’s Slideshare favorites

Want to read a book?

Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath
Presentation Zen, Garr Reynolds
Confessions of a Public Speaker, Scott Berkun
Presentation Renovation, Michael Gowin & Deanne Mott

Still don’t have the FREE 9 guide? What are you waiting for?

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 7 – Give Cues

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.023NOTE: This is the seventh in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Cues are like visual and verbal sign posts. They help your audience navigate your presentation and figure out what to expect next.

You can give visual cues in your slidedeck. Notice, for example, how each major point in this presentation begins with a slide that shows a number. That’s a cue.

You can give verbal cues as well. “First…” “Next…” “By contrast…” Those are cues.

Use cues like these to refocus your audience’s attention.

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 5 – Use Pictures

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.017NOTE: This is the fifth in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Since you’re using less text, you can now use more pictures. In fact, you could get rid of almost all your text and use pictures alone.

Research shows that adding an image to your message helps people remember 65% of what you said. If they only hear it, they’ll remember just 10%.

Choose images that express ideas and complement your talk. The image on the previous page, for example, could be used to convey the idea of choices.

And for maximum impact, use high-quality images that fill the slide (A “full bleed” images).

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 3 – One Idea Per Slide

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.011NOTE: This is the third in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Just as your presentation should emphasize one big idea, make each slide about one thing.

If you have five lines of text on your slide now, break it up into one line on five separate slides.

And get rid of the bullet points, fancy builds, text animation, and slide transition effects.

Too much clutter distracts people. They pay attention to the stuff on your slide instead of you. The purpose of your slide is not to show how clever you are. It’s to help you make your points (see point #1).

Instead, put more time into planning your message. Thee return is much higher than you’ll get on that silly swoosh effect.

9 Steps to Better Presentations: Part 1 – Don’t Default to PowerPoint

9_-_A_Simple_Guide_to_Better_Presentations.005NOTE: This is the first in a series of posts taken from our guide 9: A Simple Guide to Better Presentations. Can’t wait and want to get it all now? Download the eBook for FREE here.

Who ever said every talk, meeting, or presentation needs PowerPoint?

Nobody.

Here’s a handy rule of thumb: if it (and “it” means anything in your presentation) helps you make your point, fine. If it doesn’t, consider dropping it.In fact, your presentation may be stronger without slides. (Abraham Lincoln never used PowerPoint.)

Do slides help you make your point? No?

Then do you really need them?