Designing Your Presentation? Aaron Draplin Shows You What You’re Doing Wrong

Design on paper first

Like millions of other people around the world, you have a presentation to make.

And like millions of others, you’ll probably start by opening PowerPoint and putting some text and images on your slides.

Surely, this is the best way to make a presentation, right?

Wrong.

In fact, this is probably the worst way to create a presentation.

A good presentation requires time away from the computer.

Time to think.

Time to plan.

Time to get your ideas straight.

Time to get your message together.

Time to develop the visual feel of the slides.

Time to rehearse.

Sure, you’ll need to get text and images on your slides–eventually. But don’t start there. There’s a ton of value in sitting down with a pencil and paper long before you park yourself in front of the computer. Why? The ideas come much more freely when you work on paper, and you’re practically guaranteed to end up with something better.

Good graphic designers know this as well. Check out veteran designer Aaron Draplin in the video below (also linked here) as he walks you through the process of designing a logo from scratch.

Whether a logo or a poster or a joke or a presentation, the process works the same way.

Start on paper.

In fact, this is the very process we recommend in our 80-page Presentation Renovation eBook and audiobook–which you can download for free now.

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